Now, truth be told, affiliate marketing does come with some costs. Fortunately, those costs are rather small when compared to starting other businesses. For example, if you want to succeed with affiliate marketing in the same way that I teach it, you’ll need a website. In order to have a website, you need to pay for “website hosting”. If you don’t know what website hosting is, don’t worry, we’ll get to that, but website hosting does cost a few bucks per month (generally under $10 / mo). If you have about $40 for startup costs and about $10 / mo for recurring expenses, this is entirely doable. There are many other optional expenses for affiliate marketing, which I will also get into, but those optional expenses are used more for speeding up the path to success (outsourcing, etc.) rather than a requirement for success. When I first started my affiliate marketing business, I had about $200 to my name.
Take ThirstyAffiliates, for example. This plugin helps you add affiliate links to your site and then organize and manage them. You can also include corresponding images, and track your links’ statistics. Pretty Links offers many of the same features, but focuses on optimizing your affiliate links. Both plugins have premium versions offering even more functionality. There are also plenty of alternative options to choose from.

It’s no secret that consumers are now spending the majority of their digital time on their mobile devices, and 80% of Pinterest’s traffic is generated through its mobile app. This means that when users click on affiliate pins, they will most often be taken to the mobile version of advertisers’ sites. An engaging, user-friendly mobile experience, with simple checkout options will help increase conversions.

Sponsorships, on the other hand, are direct endorsements of your brand or content. You’re paid a lump sum, ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, regardless if you generate traffic and revenue for the company. Because of this, sponsorship deals are typically only offered to established blogs who can provide a decent amount traffic to the company endorsing them. This makes affiliate marketing a much better income source for new and smaller blogs.
          The quality of your photos can make or break your pin’s success. As new bloggers, we’re all cash-strapped, this is one area where you can’t be cheap. Don’t underestimate the power of professional quality images! I use Deposit Photos to source all my images for pins. Typically, I’ll search for images like “feminine computer desk” or “workspace with flowers.”
Hi Peter, I personally have never tried promoted pins on Pinterest but it’s on my to-do list. I’ve heard mixed reviews (they made some changes back in June or July on ads that seem to favour bigger companies). I have heard however that if you promote a pin, your whole account gets a bit of a lift. I would definitely recommend giving it a go with a small dollar amount to see if it works, I think I will try too and will report back!
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