Nah, you should work backwards: Start looking for the “noisiest” people on social media; the ones who have posted written or video reviews, tweets about how much they like your product, and of course, those who leverage Instagram. It’s important to check all social media because these potential partners may have, say, posted on Facebook about you but haven’t bothered to post on Instagram specifically. Then, after you’ve compiled a list, cross-reference their names/emails with your customer database. Got a match? That person is a prime candidate to reach out to, if they meet the criteria above that we’ve already established.
All of the above info is for those of you who want to learn affiliate marketing for free. As you can see, there is a lot of free help for you if you plan on doing all of this yourself. However, I also know that some of you do have some funding available and you want to create a bit of a shortcut to success. The only way to do that is to outsource right now.

I am creating this comment now in Jan 2018 . Not sure if this comment section on Amazon is still active since the above blog post is dated in Sept 2017. Things seem to change fast these days. Just noticed a post in a recent facebook group that Amazon affiliates program is now requiring applicants to have a fully developed website before you will be approved with Amazon affiliates program. The only other way is to have a facebook group with sufficient following. Hmmm! Any truth to this facebook post and/or comment on this matter would be appreciated

Affiliates may only post affiliate links on social media feeds they operate in line with their website URL, such as Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter. Affiliate links are prohibited on some social sharing sites, such as Pinterest and Tumblr. When posting content outside of Etsy, it is the Affiliate’s responsibility to follow each site’s policies on affiliate link
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