Great stuff here Sean – thanks for all of these insights and sharing some best practices when it comes to affiliate marketing. I’ve never been comfortable giving it a shot, but after reading this post and your perspective on how and when to do it, I may just have to give it a try. Especially considering I’m already mentioning and recommending services and products on my site, I’m just not getting the potential rewards associated with doing so. Thanks again.

If all of this has convinced you that you want to start as an affiliate influencer on Instagram, or if you’re a brand and you want to recruit some influencers on an affiliate basis remember some of the key points - make sure that your Instagram profile stands out from the rest, work on developing good relationships with the people you want to work with and make sure you have a strategy and clear expectations that work for you both. This way neither of you will be disappointed and you should be on your way to creating more revenue.
You will see that I created a simple image with some selling features, noting the SALE, warranty, RETURNS and a big SWIPE UP which was pointing to my http://bit.ly/amazonferrariwatch URL I created from the Amazon Associates Affiliate Offering code (yea it’s a mouthful) but it’s the big long messy URL in the image below (which is from Bit.ly dashboard). This is an amazing officially licensed Ferrari watch backed with a 2 year warranty and FREE returns. It doesn’t get any nicer of a “sell” than offering all these things to an automotive enthusiast following like I have!
Because Amazon has a huge selection, and it’s so easy to generate an affiliate link for just about any product, it can be easy to fall into the trap of promoting an Amazon product without getting to know the product first. As a result, it can be really easy to start promoting something you don’t know very well, and risking the trust of your audience in the process.
Write a description using your main target long-tail keyword and 2-3 related keywords from the search results. With a regular pin, your main target keyword should be in your blog post title. meta description, pin title, and pin description. Affiliate pins don’t have a blog post title or meta description so you just need to focus on the pin title and pin description. This below is my affiliate description. Notice how I effortlessly weave in the keywords? After writing your description, read it over and make sure it sounds natural. Below, I used #affiliate, but now I use #ad to be more explicit.
Most marketers need to gain these skills quickly because they are expected to bring certain results in a limited timeframe. Therefore, they research the best ways to learn affiliate marketing hoping to find some up-to-date free affiliate marketing courses, training, guides, ebooks and tutorials that will help ground them in strong fundamentals and help learn them.
I’m really interested in your advice however I really can’t get my head around how it can ‘fit’ or ‘help’ my Instagram following. I have a small growing steadily following on Instagram. But I need to somehow turn that following into an earning. I have a great business idea that is a ‘new concept’ online homewares store. ‘My_Tiny_Vignette’ (on Instagram)

Pinterest users have always been able to pin images from sites that contain affiliate links, but just over a year ago users were banned from embedding affiliate links directly in a pin itself. This tactic was one of the primary ways pinners could generate revenue, as they could potentially earn a commission from any merchant partner they directed a user to. However, rampant spammer abuse led Pinterest to ban the practice.


Win-win-win. The advertiser wins because they only pay when a purchase is made (as opposed to the shotgun approach of paying to advertise to the masses and waiting for a small percentage to actually buy). The affiliate wins because they make money while providing helpful advice. The customer wins because they get a trusted recommendation for something they might not otherwise have known about.

In early May, Pinterest lifted its ban on affiliate links in pins—huge news for publishers and advertisers alike. Pinterest emerged as an online destination for consumers looking for new trends and products since its creation in 2010, and with over 100 million monthly active users and worldwide reach, it represents a massive opportunity for players in the affiliate space.


Theme – you don’t need a special theme for affiliate marketing, you probably just need a blog. I recommend StudioPress themes since that’s what Yoast, Matt Cutts (from Google), and I use. Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress also recommends them. One of the biggest mistakes I made was using a theme from Themeforest… since they’re built by independent developers who may stop making updates to their theme. This happened to me and I hear horror stories all the time about people having to switch themes and redesign their entire site. I’ve been using the same StudioPress theme (Outreach Pro) for 3 years. Their themes are lightweight (load fast), SEO-friendly via optimized code, secure, and they have a huge selection of plugins for the Genesis Framework and an awesome community in the Genesis WordPress Facebook Group. They include documentation for setting it up and will serve you for many, many years.
There’s a popular saying among affiliate marketers and that saying is “content is king.” Content is truly the lifeblood of any affiliate marketing business. So far, everything you have had to learn has actually been relatively easy. Learning how the affiliate marketing industry works is easy to understand once it’s explained to you. Doing market research is easy if you know what to look for. Creating a website is SUPER easy. Writing hundreds of pages of content? Not so easy.

It's especially true now that the big media players are finally waking up to affiliate marketing (NYTime buying WireCutter and SweetHome) and BestReviews (which was already an epic product review site in it's self due to the fact they built their own 10,000 sq ft testing lab) being acquired by Tronc (owns the LA Times and half a dozen more publications).
Hi Kate, on Pinterest, you can add the affiliate URL when you create the new pin on your account. If you already have the pin made and want to add the affiliate link, you can just “edit” the pin and change the URL. Hope that makes sense. In the book, Elise has a step by step tutorial with photos on how to add the URL to Pinterest in case you need more help.
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