Don’t set a goal to write 3 blog posts a day… set a goal to write 1 blog post a week and make that post super helpful, long, and filled with information that is so valuable you will say “yeah, people will link to that.” 90% of my traffic/affiliate income comes from just 20 tutorials, many of which are 5+ years old. But I am constantly updating them to make the content better.
Today on the show, I’m talking with Michelle from Making Sense of Cents. Michelle and her husband sold their house in July of 2015 and now travel full-time in their RV. Some of their more recent adventures include a 2-week sailing trip to explore the possibility of sailing full-time in the future. Michelle is a blogger who shares income reports on her blog. If you take a look at her latest Income report, you will see that she earned over $100,000 on her blog in the month of August alone, while working less than 10 hours per week. That’s how she can afford to travel full-time.
Besides your images, keywords are the other major make or break factor for your pins. Spend some time to identify 2-3 relevant keywords that people would use to search for the problem you’re solving. Focus on just one target keyword phrase that you absolutely want to rank for. Then add one or two other related keywords. To figure out what keywords to choose, put yourself in the shoes of your target audience. What would they search in order to find a solution to the problem your affiliate product solves?
In most cases, organizations that employ an affiliate strategy tend to be in the e-commerce space. That’s because it is fairly simple for e-commerce brands to track purchases based on a single tracking link. Other types of business, like B2B software or services, tend to be ill suited for affiliate programs because of long and complex sales cycles.
Based on my research, I chose ‘affiliate marketing on Pinterest without a blog’ as my main target keyword. This what they call a long-tail keyword, a phrase that conveys a specific idea. It’s important to use long-tail keywords because then you’ll be giving users exactly what they’re looking for. If you use just ‘affiliate marketing’ as your keyword, you’ll be competing against everyone on Pinterest who has ever written anything about affiliate marketing. Thanks to proper keyword research, the first and seventh pins in the search results below are my own.
Hi Peter, I personally have never tried promoted pins on Pinterest but it’s on my to-do list. I’ve heard mixed reviews (they made some changes back in June or July on ads that seem to favour bigger companies). I have heard however that if you promote a pin, your whole account gets a bit of a lift. I would definitely recommend giving it a go with a small dollar amount to see if it works, I think I will try too and will report back!
×