Okay, so far we’ve talked about some of the key strategies for success as an Amazon affiliate, focused mostly on the positives—the what to dos—along with a few things to avoid. Now let’s talk about a few more things on the negative side of the equation: the practices you need to avoid if you want to grow your affiliate income (and yes, avoid getting in trouble with Amazon).

You can use social media to share your blog content with affiliate links, or you can directly share your affiliate links. Note, that you should give an indication that the link is an affiliate link when you post to be transparent and not annoy your followers. People don't want to be sold to all the time, so posting affiliate links should be interspersed with non-affiliate and non-sales posts.


Affiliate Disclaimer – if you sign up for SiteGround using my affiliate link I will donate a good chunk at no expense to you. This year I donated $3,000 to feed the homeless in Denver. In 2017, I donated $3,000 to American Red Cross at Hurricane Harvey. Your support helps and I genuinely appreciate it. I try to make my reviews unbiased and backed by evidence in the form of Facebook polls, tweets, and real conversations. If you don’t want to use it, here’s a non-affiliate link to SiteGround. Either way I truly believe they’re the best host and that your site will run faster/smoother… do your research on Google and Facebook groups and you’ll find most people say the same.
Then I made my very first affiliate sale for my favorite travel blogging course. It was a recurring payment of $38.80 (someone purchased the course on a payment plan.) I was over the moon! I had been promoting that course for 2 months before I finally made a sale. This small win encouraged me to continue trying different strategies to promote affiliate products.
Recipes: If you use any type of social media, you know that recipes are a great way to create shareable content. If you can find some way to relate your topic to food and include a recipes section, you’ll have a place to add unlimited content. Plus, you can extend your product promotions into related cooking tools. Need a source for blog-worthy recipes? Check out the freelancers at Fiverr.
Jon Hayes, the author of the Authority Hacker Amazon affiliate site, says, “When it comes to plug-ins, it’s important to remember that Amazon is extremely harsh with their penalties.” Since its very easy to lose your Amazon Associates affiliate account for incorrect linking, Hayes recommends that “affiliates should thoroughly check to see whether the plug-in is compliant and approved by Amazon or not.”
If you’re going to sign up for any of their premium services, I personally recommend you sign up for this business building package. Basically, you are paying their experts to go out and perform market research, build a website for you, build you an email responder that will automatically email your subscribers for one year, and create the first handful of content pages. They will also help you research the best affiliate products to promote and give you access to special one-on-one coaching that is only available for their paying members. Check it out if you have the funding to get this type of jump start. Outsourcing from day 1 is ideal if you have the funds available, especially when you are outsourcing to a team of people managed by affiliate marketing millionaires.
Hi Peter, I personally have never tried promoted pins on Pinterest but it’s on my to-do list. I’ve heard mixed reviews (they made some changes back in June or July on ads that seem to favour bigger companies). I have heard however that if you promote a pin, your whole account gets a bit of a lift. I would definitely recommend giving it a go with a small dollar amount to see if it works, I think I will try too and will report back!
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